Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Geothermal Spot - Seltun, Iceland

I LOVE visiting the geothermal spots in Iceland.

Whenever I walked to a geothermal spot, I felt like I was in another planet. The vents, the red dirt, the boiling mud pots and the smell of sulfur is quite an experience. We visited a few geothermal areas in Iceland, but for me, Seltun was impressive and has left me intrigued what can be possibly boiling beneath us.

 It drizzled when we were driving towards Seltun.

 T'was a sight to see so many mud pots and the smell of sulfur was ubiquitous. My clothes, skin and hair smelled like sulfur when we got home that day. I finally experienced what my Dad used to tell us about sulfur when he was still working at the Batong-Buhay gold mines.

 More mud pots and fumaroles.

 Boiling mud pot.



It would have been nice if we brought eggs to boil here.


 I really felt like walking in a another planet.

 Mineral deposits from geothermal activity.


According to my Reykjanes brochure, "Seltun is an important geothermal area. It provides a wealth of study opportunities due to the great variety of features. Sulphur is especially abundant and has been mined there in the past. Cold, clear water flows off the hillsides and through areas teeming with fumaroles and boiling mudpots."

14 comments:

  1. The place really is intriguing, only the very adventurous would readily dare brave the surroundings of the 100deg Celsius warnings :)

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    1. Aside from the heat, I found the smell of Sulphur suffocating.

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  2. It is such an amazing place. It does, indeed, look like another planet.

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    1. Yes, it does. I had a great time exploring Seltun.

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  3. parang mars? haha!

    i've never heard of a geothermal spot before. meron spring... there's one in bicol. you can actually swim in it. :)

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    1. Yes, there are so many hot springs in Iceland as well.

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  4. Like KG, I just heard about this, and I think I wanna go visit to one.

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  5. Ah sulfur..don't know if I can stay there for long but the photos look good for visiting. :D

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  6. incredible sights. i like the colorations. i can just imagine the smell, not fond of sulfur smell though, but i'm really curious about geothermal spots.

    how have you been? i'm back from my vacay.

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  7. I am not sure if I've heard of this before but this makes me curious. I wish I could visit one geothermal spot one day.

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  8. Really looks like soil from another planet. By the way, I read a feature/ research recently that traveling to Iceland is one of the most expensive trips.

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  9. Hi there! Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge about geothermal with us. You have such a very informative post. It was very well said. Anyway, in addition to what you have written, heat pumps provide winter heating by extracting heat from a source and transferring it into a building. Heat can be extracted from any source, no matter how cold, but a warmer source allows higher efficiency. A ground source heat pump uses the top layer of the earth's crust as a source of heat, thus taking advantage of its seasonally moderated temperature. Our drill rigs are all wheel drive with a low center of gravity thus making it possible to transverse difficult sites. Geothermal NH

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  10. I've never been to a geothermal spot before. It must have been such an interesting and unique experience. I can only imagine the smell of the place.

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