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Kitchen Diary: My Interpretation of Tupig

I have been craving for tupig or tinupig. Since my stomach is still very sensitive, I make sure my meals or snacks are all prepared at home. So I made it a mission to research the recipe for tupig and if I can use the oven instead of charcoal. I'm not sure if there's an English translation for tupig but all I know is that, my sister and I are loyal fans of this snack being sold on the streets of Baguio City. They're usually sold at street vendor stands, rain or shine, you'll see a seller fanning her charcoal stove, carefully roasting and checking if the tupigs have achieved their golden brown color. The aromatic scent of a roasted, closed to burnt, Banana leaf means there's a tinupig nearby or just around the corner. It's best to eat them warm and darn right sticky to your hands.

Breakfast Menu: Coffee and Tupig

I had to base my tupig recipe on two websites: Filipino Style Recipe and Ilokano's Best. Please check both sites and find which one works for you.

Below is my tweaked version based on these two recipes.

Ingredients: Coconut Cream, Butter, Brown Sugar, Glutinous Rice Flour and shredded Young Coconut

Tinupig

Ingredients:

1 pack of glutinous rice flour
1 1/2 cups dark brown sugar (depends on how sweet you want it)
1 pack of shredded young coconuts
1 stick of unsalted butter (soft)
1 can of coconut cream (see my note regarding adding this whole can)

Banana leaves for wrapping

Procedure:

- take your Banana leaves and pass them over a flame or grill to make them pliable or softer (doing this makes them easier to work with especially when it's time to wrap the tupig mixture); the Banana leaves should get shiny and softer

- preheat oven at 375 degrees

- do this in particular order: mix softened butter, sugar, shredded coconut and glutinous soft (don't worry if they're not mixing well that's what the Coconut Cream is for)

- slowly add coconut milk BUT make sure not to make the mixture runny or it will be hard to wrap, sticky is the consistency you should look for

- when mixture consistency is achieved, pour 1/4 cup of mixture on Banana leaves and roll 


- place on a cookie sheet, single layer and make sure they don't overlap to ensure cooking uniformity

- cook in oven for about 30-45 minutes (NOTE: Check tupigs at around 30 minutes and increase time if they're not done yet, I had to keep checking mine and cooked it for 50 minutes because I wanted my tupig to be golden brown and wanted the Banana leaf to be burnt a little bit.)

This is mixture consistency you're looking for - just enough Coconut Cream so that it's easier to wrap.

I love my tupig a little bit burnt so that it gives me just enough crunch but soft and chewy in the inside.

I hope you can start making your own tupig and let me know how it came out.

Tupig reminds me of a world gone and only accessible through the whiff of familiar memories and smells; a time when Baguio was still cold and clean. Sadly, I heard the Summer Capital isn't as cold as it used to be, and the fog is almost taken over by smog. Fortunately, I can make my own tupig and be reminded of the good things and savor once more a favorite snack from my childhood.

Comments

  1. that is a perfect tupig if i've ever seen one. i remember that we get them at the local market, but we prefer the ones that come as pasalubong from vendors in pangasinan. when is studied in mla i always ask for tupig to be brought to me whenever my brother would deliver my allowance. my dormmates from other provinces quickly learned to enjoy the tupig and wait patiently with me for my brother's arrival.

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    Replies
    1. As far as I can remember, this was a treat for us in Baguio. My sister and I would just get one each - although of course, we'd like to eat more...lol.

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  2. Replies
    1. Cel, gawa ka tupig. Mama makes inkiwar a lot, so tupig is a different texture and taste.

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  3. Perfect looking and I bet it tastes as good as it looks. Well done, Kayni. I rarely get to eat tupig as it is only available in the northern provinces. But I like its coconut taste. Now I'm craving for one he he he ;)

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    Replies
    1. I was amazed that it did taste good. This is my second time making tupig. Oh, I hope you can get some tupig soon :).

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  4. It looks awesome, Kayni. I can smell it from here! I want to do this. We only get to eat tupig maybe once a year when Ceasar's staf returns from vacation. I didn't know it is this easy and simple. I have all the ingredients on my cupboard except for the Banana leaves. I hope to find one soon.

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    Replies
    1. Kero, You have to make it and let me know. I'm sure manong C and little C will love it :). Miss you all and sending you lots of hugs.

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  5. Hello sis, I just saw rows and rows of tupig at a stall in the market this morning (or yesterday, seeing that it's already 4:11 in the morning) I did not give it a second glance but now, your blog and pictures is making me regret it. :D Maybe I should send my hubby and get some for breakfast. :)

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  6. i love tupig too! i will try this. thanks for sharing the recipe :)

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